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Why do nurses want to work in Florida?

It’s not exactly a “breaking news” type of headline – but the majority of RNs that reach out to us have an expressed interest in travel nursing in the beautiful state of Florida. Is there more to it than just the desire to work near white sandy beaches, under bright-blue, sunny skies, or in idyllic 70 degree weather? The answer is: yes!

travel nursing florida

 

 

Florida Needs More Nurses in Winter

Florida is a seasonal destination for those looking to not freeze their “balls” off during those cold winter months and as such, hospital censuses increase, as does the need for more nurses. What comes with an increase in need for nurses? Higher travel nurse pay.

 

Added Bonus: Florida is the third most populous state and is booming with a high rate of growth (many of them seniors with lots of healthcare needs) and a growing need for healthcare staffing.

 

Lots of Specialties to Choose From

With over 200 hospitals, Florida has a wide variety of travel opportunities. As of today’s writing, Next Move has over 200 openings in over 40 specialties ranging from ER to ICU to Tele.

 

Added Bonus: If you’re enjoying Florida while on assignment, it’s extremely easy to extend your contract at your current hospital – or at a nearby hospital.

 

Lower Cost of Living in Paradise

Unfortunately Florida is not one of those ‘low-cost of living’ states – but – for a state that boasts palm trees and a flip-flop kinda vibe – it’s most definitely a lot lower than comparable areas like California and Hawaii. Florida has a cost of living that is just 1% higher than the national average while in California it’s 16.5% higher and in Hawaii, it’s 27.4% higher.

 

Added Bonus: Your travel stipend will go a lot of farther when you’re not spending the majority of it on housing. In Florida the average 1-bedroom will run you between $1,300 & $1,600 a month. Not bad when your travel stipend is $4,340 to $5,340 a month.

 

No State Income Tax

Yep. Travel nurses do have to pay state taxes in the states in which they work – however, in Florida that’s slightly different. You won’t have to pay any state income tax while working an assignment in Florida. (But you will still have to pay federal income tax).

 

Travel Nurse Taxes: How to Get the Highest Return

 

Not Working? You’re on Vacation.

One of the BEST parts about taking an assignment in Florida is that when you’re not working – it’ll feel like you’re on vacation. Grab that “block scheduling” if you can, and you’re set to lay on the beach, go for a sail, take a quick trip to the Bahamas, check out Disney World, try a fishing charter, see some waterfalls – honestly the list of “what to do on your days off” could go on forever in a beautiful state like Florida.

 

Easy International Travel

When you live in this little slice of paradise you’re also a hop, skip & and jump away from the vacation of your dreams,  at the end of your contract. Grab a margarita in Mexico, go snorkeling in Belize, take a Cruise just about anywhere – and in just over 10 hours – plop your little butt down in a cute Parisian café in France. 

 

Not all Sunshine & Rainbows

There are of course a few drawbacks to living in Florida – and we’d be remiss to not mention them.

 

Tourists: They’re everywhere, all the dang time. Think heavy traffic in the metro areas, populated beaches, and long restaurant wait times. Avoid this by visiting some of the “less hot” destinations like Naples, Seaside or Cedar Key.

 

Hot & Rainy: It’s not always just a bunch of sun-shiny days in Florida. Some days it can just get damn right hot & humid, with tons of rain June through September.

 

Flood Insurance: If you’re not renting through a housing site like Airbnb.com or VRBO.com – you might want to consider buying flood insurance, as most renter’s insurance do not cover damages caused by flooding. This is especially important if you’re renting in a low-lying area.

 

Allergies: Florida is a very green place with tons of weeds like ragweed & dog fennel and trees like oak & pine that are all bursting year round – which can cause problems if you tend to suffer from allergies.

 

Gators & other Critters: Yep. You may have heard about any of the “Only in Florida” gator stories where alligators are randomly found throughout the state, such as a surprise visit to a local gas station, a long swim in someone’s backyard pool or a lazy day, sunning their green little bellies on a golf course. In addition, Florida has a surplus of wild snakes, fire ants and more than 80 species of mosquitoes.

 

If you’re still reading then you’re interested in travel nursing in this glorious place we all call Florida – we can just tell. Click below to be connected with a recruiter who can give you all the details for current Florida openings in your specialty. 

 

More Information: Florida Nursing Jobs

 

Next Move Inc

NURSE FIRST.
NURSE POWERED.
(816) 601 -3800

Info@NextMoveInc.com

Make sure to Follow us on Facebook for travel nursing content and high paying travel nursing jobs! 

 

 

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